Automatically enable HTTPS on your website with EFF's Certbot, deploying Let's Encrypt certificates.

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Install

Not all of Certbot's dependencies are available in the standard repositories. To use Certbot, you must first enable the EPEL (Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux) repository.

Since it doesn't seem like your operating system has a packaged version of Certbot, you should use our certbot-auto script to get a copy:

wget https://dl.eff.org/certbot-auto
chmod a+x certbot-auto

certbot-auto accepts the same flags as certbot; it installs all of its own dependencies and updates the client code automatically.

Certbot's DNS plugins which can be used to automate obtaining a wildcard certificate from Let's Encrypt's ACMEv2 server are not available for your OS yet. This should change soon but if you don't want to wait, you can use these plugins now by running Certbot in Docker instead of using the instructions on this page.

Get Started

Certbot supports a number of different “plugins” that can be used to obtain and/or install certificates.

Since your server architecture doesn't yet support automatic installation you'll have to use the certonly command to obtain your certificate.

$ sudo ./path/to/certbot-auto certonly

This will allow you interactively select the plugin and options used to obtain your certificate. If you already have a webserver running, we recommend choosing the "webroot" plugin.

Alternatively, you can specify more information on the command line.

To obtain a cert using the "webroot" plugin, which can work with the webroot directory of any webserver software:

$ sudo ./path/to/certbot-auto certonly --webroot -w /var/www/example -d example.com -d www.example.com -w /var/www/thing -d thing.is -d m.thing.is

This command will obtain a single cert for example.com, www.example.com, thing.is, and m.thing.is; it will place files below /var/www/example to prove control of the first two domains, and under /var/www/thing for the second pair.

To obtain a cert using a built-in “standalone” webserver (you may need to temporarily stop your existing webserver, if any) for example.com and www.example.com:

$ sudo ./path/to/certbot-auto certonly --standalone -d example.com -d www.example.com

Automating renewal

Certbot can be configured to renew your certificates automatically before they expire. Since Let's Encrypt certificates last for 90 days, it's highly advisable to take advantage of this feature. You can test automatic renewal for your certificates by running this command:

$ sudo ./path/to/certbot-auto renew --dry-run
If that appears to be working correctly, you can arrange for automatic renewal by adding a cron job or systemd timer which runs the following:
./path/to/certbot-auto renew

An example cron job might look like this, which will run at noon and midnight every day:

0 0,12 * * * python -c 'import random; import time; time.sleep(random.random() * 3600)' && ./path/to/certbot-auto renew 

More detailed information and options about renewal can be found in the full documentation.

Install

Not all of Certbot's dependencies are available in the standard repositories. To use Certbot, you must first enable the EPEL (Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux) repository.

Since it doesn't seem like your operating system has a packaged version of Certbot, you should use our certbot-auto script to get a copy:

wget https://dl.eff.org/certbot-auto
chmod a+x certbot-auto

certbot-auto accepts the same flags as certbot; it is a wrapper that installs all of its own dependencies and updates the client code automatically.

Certbot's DNS plugins which can be used to automate obtaining a wildcard certificate from Let's Encrypt's ACMEv2 server are not available for your OS yet. This should change soon but if you don't want to wait, you can use these plugins now by running Certbot in Docker instead of using the instructions on this page.

Get Started

Certbot supports a number of different “plugins” that can be used to obtain and/or install certificates.

Since your server architecture doesn't yet support automatic installation you'll have to use the certonly command to obtain your certificate.

$ sudo ./path/to/certbot-auto certonly

This will allow you interactively select the plugin and options used to obtain your certificate. If you already have a webserver running, we recommend choosing the "webroot" plugin.

Alternatively, you can specify more information on the command line.

To obtain a cert using the "webroot" plugin, which can work with the webroot directory of any webserver software:

$ sudo ./path/to/certbot-auto certonly --webroot -w /var/www/example -d example.com -d www.example.com -w /var/www/thing -d thing.is -d m.thing.is

This command will obtain a single cert for example.com, www.example.com, thing.is, and m.thing.is; it will place files below /var/www/example to prove control of the first two domains, and under /var/www/thing for the second pair.

To obtain a cert using a built-in “standalone” webserver (you may need to temporarily stop your existing webserver, if any) for example.com and www.example.com:

$ sudo ./path/to/certbot-auto certonly --standalone -d example.com -d www.example.com

Automating renewal

Certbot can be configured to renew your certificates automatically before they expire. Since Let's Encrypt certificates last for 90 days, it's highly advisable to take advantage of this feature. You can test automatic renewal for your certificates by running this command:

$ sudo ./path/to/certbot-auto renew --dry-run
If that appears to be working correctly, you can arrange for automatic renewal by adding a cron job or systemd timer which runs the following:
./path/to/certbot-auto renew

An example cron job might look like this, which will run at noon and midnight every day:

0 0,12 * * * python -c 'import random; import time; time.sleep(random.random() * 3600)' && ./path/to/certbot-auto renew 

More detailed information and options about renewal can be found in the full documentation.